Our Roman Holiday… 5 days of gelato, coffee, street art and, er, cats in Rome

Watching the film Roman Holiday on a rooftop in Rome, Italy

We spent the whole day doing things I’ve always wanted to.”
Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday.

Watching Roman Holiday on a rooftop, with St Peter's in the background

Somewhere up on a rooftop in Rome, with St Peter’s illuminated in the background and a glass of cava in hand, I watched Roman Holiday for the first time. It was by far my best outdoor cinema experience ever. The 1953 film stars Audrey Hepburn as the not so perfect princess and Gregory Peck as her not so perfect knight in shining armour… set in the really rather perfect setting of 50s Rome. They whizz about on mopeds, eat gelato, sip coffee, fall in love… and do so without anyone ever breaking a sweat or getting sunburnt.

Liuk – vintage lemonade and liquorice ice lolly

Our Roman Holiday, on the other hand, well in most of the pictures I look less like an Audrey Hepburn princess and more just pickled. Being Scottish means that I can do about 30 mins in 32 degrees before I start to melt. Which meant that in our 5 days in Rome it was essential for me to eat my body weight in gelato and coffee granita. Absolutely essential.

Gelato at Gelateria del Teatro, Rome, Italy

Our favourite gelato places were: Hedera Sweetness & Co, Gelateria del Teatro and Fatamorgana. We experimented with Lavender and Peach, Sicilian Peach, White Chocolate with Basil, Custard and Pine Nuts, Rose Petals and Violet Flowers, Cheese and Cherry, Cheese and Walnut Fig, and even Kentucky” (chocolate with tobacco). Did I mention we ate a lot of gelato in 5 days? 

Rome essential: Coffee granita at Taza D’Oro

Also I now firmly believe that a coffee granita at Taza D’Oro is an essential part of any visit to Rome. The other half took a picture of me while eating mine; I have a really crazy wide-eyed look of ‘oh my freaking goodness’ while I’m devouring it. To say that I was a little hyper afterwards would be the understatement of the year.

Inbetween eating all the sweet icy things, we did take some time to see the sights of Rome… in fact, one of the things I hadn’t realised about Rome is just how many old things there are to see. And when you even start to think about how old they are, you get a bit dizzy… or at least you do if you’ve been living on gelato and coffee for the last few days.

The Colosseum in Rome, Italy

So, the Colosseum. It’s 1942 years old. That blows my mind. So we did what we do when faced with such an ancient artifact… jumping shots!

Getting ready to do a jumpstagram at the Colosseum in Rome Italy

Now the thing with the Colosseum (and all of Rome really) is there’s a lot of people about. Like a HUGE amount. And they will stare at you a HUGE amount if you sit down on the ground to take jumping shots of your other half… the tired, grumpy, exhausted stares of tourists who are hot, bothered and mind-boggled by too much old stuff.

Jumpstagram at the Colosseum in Rome Italy

Definitely a ‘when in Rome’ moment… that was especially hard to capture as I was giggling too much. The other half assured me that jumping in that heat was particularly hard. Not that it stopped him of course.

rome-spanish-steps

Now I may have mentioned that Rome is really, really busy… London’s Oxford Street on a Saturday or Edinburgh during the Fringe you ain’t got nothing on Rome. But see in Roman Holiday, Audrey Hepburn eats ice cream on the Spanish Steps and there’s hardly a soul about.

From where I stand in Rome

Standing on the Spanish Steps in Rome

Meanwhile on our Roman Holiday, this was the only way we could take pictures of each other without a bazillion other people in the background. (Well, almost. We do have an ‘arrgh, the Spanish Steps are soooo busy’ selfie of the two of us too. It’s actually one of my favourite pics of the two of us.)

Tourists on the Spanish Steps in Rome

Because in reality the Spanish Steps look like this… yes, there are steps under there somewhere. See those people just standing at the bottom of the steps, contemplating whether they really want to go up them or not? I’m guessing they were surprised by how busy they were too.

Hiding between the pillars at The Vatican in Rome, Italy

Similarly, the Vatican… we visited at the end of the day when officially it was closed, the crowds had dispersed and the sun was beginning to set.

Alone at the Vatican in Rome

If you’re not a big fan of crowds and don’t mind not going inside, I’d highly recommend doing it this way… there was something weird and wonderful about having it to ourselves. Like we’d stumbled onto a Dan Brown film set. (One of those movies I’d only recommend seeing if it’s on TV and you’re having a lazy day on the couch… and you can’t reach the remote to change the channel.)

Roman Forum in Rome

But back to the very, very old stuff… Rome has a way of making you feel rather small and inconsequential (intimidating ruins!) and then you spot the seagulls…

Seagulls at the Roman Forum in Rome

Seagull standing on a pillar in Rome, Italy

Seagull perched on Ponte Sant'Angelo statue in Rome, Italy

Seagull perched on statue on a bridge in Rome, Italy

Seagull perched on ruins in Rome, Italy

Turns out that it doesn’t matter how old you are, how much you’ve achieved, how regal, how impressive, how historic… you will inevitably end up a grand perch for a seagull. (This ‘philosophy’ may have occurred to me around 30 mins after I had the coffee granita. Plato and Socrates did all their best work after having a coffee granita.*)

Largo di Torre Argentina in Rome – where Casear was stabbed and now a cat sanctuary

Or… and this is a big or… as a sanctuary for cats! Now this place (Largo di Torre Argentina) gets a big shout-out in the history books as it’s the place where Caesar was stabbed. Proper epic history right there. But it’s almost impossible to take this information in as it’s also home to a shelter (Torre Argentina) that looks after stray cats.

Shelter cat sign at Torre Argentina in Rome, Italy

We went just went to have ‘a look’… and only just came out without having adopted Nero the black kitty with neurological problems and Stevie Wonder the cat who’s blind. Not to mention the two tiny kittens who made me well up on the way out. (There’s a high chance eating a lot of gelato might make you susceptible to tears!)

Nero the shelter cat at Largo di Torre Argentina in Rome, Italy

 

Shelter cat at Largo di Torre Argentina in Rome Italy

Shelter cats sleeping at Torre Argentina in Rome, Italy

Shelter cat sleeping at Torre Argentina in Rome, Italy

Shelter cat eating at Torre Argentina in Rome, Italy

We didn’t catch this guy’s name but you gotta love a cat that is helping itself to everyone’s dinner provisions, while putting its tail in some other food at the same time.

Rome’s other surprise was the street art… I really hadn’t considered that there would be any. Let alone cheeky angel themed street signs.

Kissing street sign in Rome, Italy

Angel street art sign in Rome Italy

Angel street art in Rome Italy

Cat being chased - street art in Rome

Life's a bite – street art in Rome

And it’s not just the street art, there’s humour and colour everywhere in Rome… faces in strange places…

Switches with faces in on a wall in Rome Italy

… and dashes of colour in even in the narrowest of winding back alleyways.

Colourful window box in Rome

And all to soon it was time to say goodbye to our little Air B’n’B apartment, and its wonderful rooftop view of St Peter’s, quirky Pinocchio touches, lovely tiles and colourful coffee makers.

Air BnB apartment in Rome, Italy

Soft green Bialetti espresso maker – Conversation Pieces Blog

Rome Air BnB apartment bathroom tiles

Until next time Rome, ti amo. You crazy city of relics, ruins, coffee, cats, gelato and  gulls. 

Rooftops and The Altar of the Fatherland in Rome, Italy

I’ll miss eating watermelon on your rooftops… the only thing I ate more than gelato! (Honestly, I had a whole watermelon to myself one day. That’s how hot I was!)

Rooftop watermelon slice in Rome, Italy

 

*May not be a historically accurate fact. Though I’m pretty sure Plato and Socrates would have enjoyed them too.